The best farming requires a farmer –a husbandman, a nurturer- not so much a technician or businessman. A technician or businessman, given the necessary abilities and ambitions, can be made in a little while by training. A good farmer, on the other hand, is a cultural product; he is made by a sort of training, certainly, in what his time imposes or demands, but he is also made by generations of experience. This essential experience can only be accumulated, tested, preserved, handed down in settled households, friendships and communities that are deliberately and carefully native to their own ground, in which the past has prepared the present and the present safeguards the future.

The best farming requires a farmer –a husbandman, a nurturer- not so much a technician or businessman. A technician or businessman, given the necessary abilities and ambitions, can be made in a little while by training. A good farmer, on the other hand, is a cultural product; he is made by a sort of training, certainly, in what his time imposes or demands, but he is also made by generations of experience. This essential experience can only be accumulated, tested, preserved, handed down in settled households, friendships and communities that are deliberately and carefully native to their own ground, in which the past has prepared the present and the present safeguards the future.
Wendell Berry, How We Grow Food Reflects Our Virtues and Vices: The Ethics of Food P.22 Rowman and Littlefield 2002

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s